Wednesday, March 20, 2013

What Would Convince You...

to learn more about NaPro Technology?



I am working on some pretty exciting new publicity, advertising, and networking ideas for work this year, and next month we will be promoting NaPro Technology at an Infertility Awareness Health Event being held at a local pharmacy chain. Our Dr will be giving a presentation on NaPro (applications for infertility) for those interested to sign up at the event.

Since the promotional materials will be set up inside the pharmacy (and perhaps elsewhere), I need them to be enticing enough to grab the attention of customers- whether it be for themselves or for a loved one they know going through infertility.

So, my question to you is, what would convince you to sign up for the talk on NaPro Technology for Infertility?

(I would be particularly interested in hearing from those of you who may not be Catholic, and therefore are mostly intrigued by the healthy alternative to IVF, finding the diagnosis, holistic healing, etc.)

Thanks in advance!

43 comments:

Nicole C said...

I have zero cool ideas, but I LOVE that you're doing this!! Thanks for your witness, A!

Simone said...

This is a great idea. I'm excited for you.
Here are some thoughts to give you ideas. something about diagnosing unexplained IF. I know that is what pushes many towards IVF when the RE tells them it is unexplained so they have to do IVF. Fixing the problem so you may have future children and not just bypassing the unknown issue.
Taking care of your health by diagnosing the issue. Endometriosis awareness. PCOS awareness. Many do not know what these are or that it causes IF. IF can be a whole body issue such as thyroid and not just reproductive-again with the health theme. Maybe info about the neg effects of the pill and the napro healthier alternative.

Erin said...

NOTHING but my faith convinced to learn about Napro. I was in the process of starting to work with a Naprotech provider when I got pregnant, and it was a giant PITA. Here were the barriers:

--I had to spend hundreds of dollars learning to chart Creighton, and the closest instructor was an hour away.

--I had to chart for several months before I would have been able to seen by a Napro provider.

--I have decent insurance (BCBS of IL). However, they would not cover the Napro doc, so that would have been entirely out of pocket.

--Since the doc was several hours away, each appt. would have also cost a ton of money in terms of gas, hotel, and lodging.

I think there would have been more barriers (getting lab work, etc.), but since I became pg naturally, I don't know what those would have been.

IVF on, the other hand, would have been COMPLETELY covered by my insurance, easily accessible in Chicago, etc.

The problem of course, isn't with Napro itself, but the widespread acceptance of IVF and other soul-destroying technologies. But, to answer your question--Napro in theory if great, but it's so inconvenient and time-consuming, that my head kind of explodes whenever a good, faithful, orthodox, well-meaning Catholic tells me to "Just use Napro!"

Erin said...

I really don't mean to sound bitter, I just wanted to vent that Napro sounds great in theory, but the practical considerations (in many parts of the country) are overwhelming--unless you are independently wealthy and have nothing but time on your hands. I didn't really care about have a deep, holistic, understanding of my body--I just wanted a dang baby.

Erin said...

When did IVF start getting covered by insurance? I know that sounds snarky but it's a genuine question. I was shocked during my research the actual success rate of IVF- spending $10,000+ on a "science" you usually have to do multiple times with a 50% or less success rate? No thanks.

Silvana said...

I think you should do a "mini market research" about what type of customers the pharmacy is serving. Mostly hippie-turned-green? Go on the natural-holistic side. Devout Catholics? Push on the faithfulness to the church teaching. Pragmatics? Compare the cost/benefits of IVF vs NaPro and the convenience to have a practitioner close by. And of course, if possible, include in the brochure short paragraphs written by "satisfied customers". God bless. :)

Lucky as Sunshine said...

TCI - I would touch on the effectiveness of NaPro vs. IVF and cost savings. If trying to attract the "crunchies" promote the more natural aspects of it.
-Erin- my insurance covers one round of IVF over the lifetime of my policy. all depends on the policy.

Perfect Power in Weakness said...

You could focus on the women's health/healing aspect of it. I was really interested in Napro because of my PCOS and wanting a way to heal/deal with it and the realm of fertility/TTC. You could also talk about the effectiveness of Napro vs IVF as well as the cost comparison. Let the numbers do the talking!

Sarah said...

Erin (#1) - so sorry you had such a difficult experience. :( It's pretty common for NaPro drs and treatments to be accepted by insurance, so hopefully most of the folks TCIE encounters won't be facing such an uphill battle.

For us, the health benefits jumped out at us (plus the insurance coverage aspect!). My dh and were already motivated to learn charting because of our faith, but when something was wrong with my charts, we didn't hesitate to go to a dr who understood those charts. So yeah, if there are Catholics around who already know about NFP, perhaps emphasizing the medical support system that surrounds Creighton (NOT to get into an NFP war, of course! Just as a positive aspect of NaPro).

Erin said...

Hi Erin: I don't know where you live, but in IL, the govt. requires insurance companies to provide comprehensive coverage for the scientific monstrosity that is IVF. If you google i, you can see the details. Seriously, you can't walk a block without trippping over an IVF doc.

Molly M. said...

I'm so glad you are doing this. I wish NaPro was a little more prominent in Wisconsin. Seriously, I live in the metro Milwaukee area and you would think that there would be some sort of FertilityCare specialist in the area if not in the capital (about 1.5 hours away), but there isn't. You have to go to a small town 2 hours from the Milwaukee area just to see a FertilityCare specialist.

I hope all your hard work pays off and I hope that NaPro can expand as a healthy alternative. Being Catholic, I would never do IVF or IUI, but I could totally get behind NaPro.

Can't wait to hear how it all goes!

JellyBelly said...

I would definitely highlight the "natural" working with your body aspect of Napro. It would attract the crunchy granola types, IMHO.

JellyBelly said...

Btw, up here in Canada most of my Napro treatments are covered by OHIP and ART isn't.

Sarah said...

If I wasn't already doing NaPro, I would be interested in learning more if it mentioned something about "managing PCOS without cancer-causing chemicals and hormones". I know that my treatment right now for PCOS IF is very similar to what a non napro doc would do (the clomid and janumet), but I love that I know my docs will never try to push ART on me, especially when I am weak, miserable, and vulnerable. My doctor cares about the health of my soul, not just my body and I love that.

St. Rita's Roses said...

Great idea...thank you so much for doing all of this. Yeah- no ideas...maybe pics of napro babies- B. rose always has that at her presentations at St. Giannas- and I know people always stop to look at those. Maybe Napro Men there to talk about how they were influenced by the program. I will offer my DH!

Kelly Summers said...

I think that in this area there are a lot of semi-wealthy, contraceptive-using couples who are into the trendy new diets and "going green" and "all-natural" foods and organics. I think it might appeal to them to hear that they can avoid conception or space children without pumping chemicals into their bodies. Maybe even something about how the pill and other contraceptives are carcinogenic?

Kelly Summers said...

By the way that is awesome that you are able to do this! How did you guys get permission from the pharmacy? And may I ask what pharmacy chain is doing this? I'd like to support them!

the misfit said...

NaPro makes me cranky. See "Catholic method for collection for S/A." Catholic doctors - try removing your heads from your colons before you write those things up.

If you want to round up a bunch of atheists who haven't pondered the human dignity aspects deeply (I'm only being partly sarcastic), make sure the words "holistic" and "natural" and "your body" are in the largest possible font. Just my $.02.

Sew said...

Dying laughing over misfits comment. Spot on!

Kat said...

I would empahsize looking at the root cause of the IF rather than jumping to just trying to conceive. Also the "natural" part of NaPro isn't so natural when they are trying to give you clomid, femara and naltrexone to conceive or deal with PMS. I know that they do not push too much on pharmaceutical meds. as much as other Drs. and emphasize supplements and nutrition as well but I always hesitate calling NaPro natural. You could say that it is more natural or environmentally friendly than ART treatments. This is awesome that you are doing this by the way, praying for you! Let us know how it goes :)

KJL said...

I agree 100% with Silvana. Mini-market research is going to help you find the best strategies.

As someone living in a rural area that is hundreds and hundreds of miles away form the closest NaPro doc (literally!) I would like to hear more about it if I knew where the resources are, and that they are accessible. You may wish to present the locations of such doctors in your area or close by, so that people will know that it could actually be a possibility for them to receive that kind of care. I also think you could present a little research on which insurance companies in your area cover what parts of NaPro, so that it is easy for people to grasp how they would pay for it.

Amy @ This Cross I Embrace said...

These are great, thank you for the suggestions!

To clarify a bit, this is a local pharmacy (like, across the street!) to our specific office. Our Dr is a D.O. family practice physician, so we won't be running into problems of distance, insurance, etc. Also, I like to think this Dr does take a much more integrative approach/holistic approach to NaPro, as a D.O. - she's not just looking at the reproductive organs ;)

Keep the ideas flowing - this will be good for future endeavors, as well!

Olya said...

Please, don't take it the wrong way but unless you are a Catholic the method is not attractive. For those who aren't limited by the teaching of their church and aren't pressured into having lots and lots of children to prove they are open to life IVF works best. Just a personal opinion. I don't have infertility issues either, but if I did I wouldn't bother with the method and would go straight to IVF. I am only writing this because you asked for non-Catholic opinion, and I think it best to tell you honestly what I think. Please, don't feel offended, it's not my goal here.

Amy @ This Cross I Embrace said...

Olya, I'm not offended at all!

Yours is an opinion I'm most interested in - but, what would potentially catch your eye in regards to "looking more" at NaPro as a non-Catholic? What, for example, was appealing to you about IVF (was it close to home, convenient for you, covered by insurance, etc?) - and what information of theirs spoke to you the most? (i.e. a billboard reading, "Have a Baby, We can Help" for example?)

Thank you for your input!

Amy @ This Cross I Embrace said...

*was - should be *would be

Infertile Catholic said...

Olya - You have revealed your ignorance about the Catholic faith. Catholics are by no means "pressured into having lots and lots of children to prove they are open to life," as you suggested.

Furthermore, I do think that although you are probably correct that at this moment, non-Catholic, infertile women would not see that NaPro offers them anything that IVF couldn't (especially when their only goal is to have a baby), I think Amy's point is to help people see that there is something additional offered by NaPro. NaPro isn't only used for helping people to conceive. It is also used to help improve a woman's complete health.

Amy, if you have any information about how long it takes for someone to conceive their second time using IVF vs. NaPro, that might be good to use, too. I have heard it stated that NaPro puts a woman's body in a healthier position, which translates into greater success conceiving again (compared to IVF, which bypasses the woman's health problems). The gross cost comparison is also very impressive (IVF vs. NaPro). Good luck!!!!

Simone said...

I am glad that I went down the napro path bc I was able to discover that I had health issues. I found endometriosis, uterine polyps, blood clotting factors, and a vitamin D deficiency, Learning about napro got me off the pill which can cause strokes. In fact,once I learned that I had blood clotting factors the hematologist told me never to go back on the pill. Drs give out the pill like candy and they do not even test you for blood clotting factors before they give it to you. I never did IVF but if I had it probably would not have worked due to the polyps or I would have miscarried due to the unknown blood clotting issues.

Olya said...

If it was about 50% less expensive (otherwise I'd choose IVF even if it was a little more just for the convenience and certainty of a baby of it and less time spent trying), close to home and if I tried IVF and it didn't work. Again, I may be misinformed (just like any average woman you are trying to interest would, probably) but I'd choose IVF 1st b/s there's more guarantee of a baby in 9 months and it seems like less work. Hope this helps.

Infertile Catholic, I was relaying a non-Catholic opinion as asked, not trying to debate with anyone concerning anything or be offensive. This is how I perceive it. You are welcome to disagree.

Olya said...

Oh, another thing I forgot to mention. But first, let me put a disclaimer. I am not a doc, and don't know much about these things, just using common sense. I suspect that while IVF helps address difficulties conceiving (ovulation issues, low sperm motility, whatever else) I don't know if it helps with issues our body might have with carrying to term while NaPro seems to deal with the latter issue as well. So you might try to interest women who had prior miscarriages (unless they were related to the egg/sperm quality which IVF does address successfully, if I am not mistaken not that women know why they miscarry often.) Like I said I haven't had a need to research this more deeply I am just your average woman you meet a store.

Amy @ This Cross I Embrace said...

Perfect, thank you!

Yes, I am thinking mostly of appealing to those who have already tried IVF and it failed - I'll be using testimonials of 2 women (both over 40) who conceived naturally and carried to term after failing 2 IVF cycles apiece... I had a feeling that would pique some interest ;)

Also good thoughts on the "carry to term" bit.

Katie said...

Visuals. Charts like the first one on this page http://www.naprotechnology.com/infertility.htm.

Something about male infertility? Everyone seems to assume Napro can't do anything about that.

I'd love to see what you come up with! And then try to pass it on to my sister, because I can't see that I'm getting anywhere with her...

Anonymous said...

I will not do IVF because I feel it is far too invasive (needles every day? No thanks), and I think I'd get a healthier child with a natural pregnancy. I also believe that jacking so many hormones into one's body to stimulate ovulation causes cancer and other unnatural side effects of being not in balance.

I do not believe in a god, and so would not choose NaPro on catholic credentials. I'd want to hear more about the "crunchy" side of things and the success rates.

Josephine said...

Hi TCIE, I've been reading your blog for a few years now and have been inspired by so many things you've written. I LOVE what you're doing to spread the news about Napro.

I struggled with infertility for 4.5 years before finally conceiving with a Napro doctor up here in Canada. As a strong Protestant believer I was totally heartbroken that IVF seemed to be our only option. Because we too believed IVF was against our faith, we felt like we had no options until a chance encounter with a Christian doctor put us in touch with a Napro doctor. I had no idea there were any other options to infertility, nor that Napro even existed. I guess I don't really have any advice but I just wanted to say that there are many non-catholic believers who also struggle with thinking IVF is the only option. I would imagine there would be people of many different faiths that would share our belief in the sanctity of life.

I like to emphasize that it is a scientifically proven approach to infertility, and the success stats compared to IVF are impressive. As was mentioned above, Napro isn't just for conceiving, but for carrying to term too. My problem turned out to be low progesterone and had I attempted IVF my low progesterone problem would have carried through and likely led to a miscarriage (I was on progesterone for 37 weeks with my pregnancy). IVF is a band-aid, Napro can be a cure.

Erin said...

You coud also point out (during the talk, not on the poster), that Napro is just in general less skeevy than a typical IVF clinic. The first time I went to a regular RE, I was grossed out becuase I thought there would be a nasty "collection room" fill of porn somewhere. The second time I went, I realized that there was no collection room, and the staff expected men just to use THE REGULAR BATHROOM to um, "collect." Which made me never want to even pee there.

Also, in the hallway there were bathrooms for the other offices in the building, which were all locked, and there were signs on the saying that fertility clinic patients were not supposed to use them. I can only assume that guys had been "collecting" in those washrooms as well. I mean, gross. and way to make you feel like a 2nd class citizen.

Blessed and Broken said...

Olya, just have to chime in and say we are happy to serve IF women of all (or no) religious backgrounds. I have worked with women who have failed IVF as well as non Catholics who get that IVF is bad medicine. Unfortunately doctors aren't out for what is best for women and the $$ reigns supreme.

I ditto "find the cause" as a point of interest. But if your target is failed IVF - saying "failed IVF?" Would be specific enough.

Anonymous said...

I am Catholic and chose to see an RE, not a NaPro doc. (I did not use IVF, but pursued morally licit treatment with the RE.) That said, many of the comments here illustrate a lot of the huge turn-offs about NaPro to me- the (ignorant and unsubstantiated) opinion that non-Napro docs just want to take your money and don't care about you. That their offices are "skeevy" (what?! I love my RE's office- they return phone calls promptly, unlike what I've heard of Omaha, they are so kind and were ecstatic for me when I got pregnant, etc.).

Honestly, I think the whole "NaPro treats the underlying causes" thing is not particularly useful. For one, infertile women don't really care about that. They care about having a baby. For another, it's not always true. If you need Clomid to ovulate, you will stop ovulating when you stop taking it. The fact that a NaPro dr and not an RE prescribed it won't change that.

I think NaPro is a good option for some people, especially people whose number one concern is that their doctor be Catholic. But it's not for everybody, including many faithful Catholics.

Amy @ This Cross I Embrace said...

I appreciate your (and everyone's) input, Anon, thank you for that.

But my chief goal here is to find suggestions for the question posed: What WOULD (or would have) convinced you to learn more about NaPro?

Regardless of which road any person ultimately chooses, I am most interested in what would make someone want to hear more about this option.

Anonymous said...

Oh yeah...forgot to get to that. Sorry. :)

I think providing specific information about how Napro can help women with PCOS or endo would be good. One of the main critiques about Napro is that promotional materials and website information are both vague and repeat the same verbage over and over.

I think women would appreciate specific information about the ways Napro treats some of these conditions- i.e. specifics about surgical procedures, dietary recommendations, medications, etc. I do realize that each woman is different and therefore you can't tell women exactly what they would undergo, but specific examples help people to feel like they are getting real information.

REs can tell you exactly what different treatments entail. In order to be seen in secular circles as more than glorified charting, NaPro needs to provide some specific examples of different treatment plans.

Barbara said...

Please advertise to women with recurrent miscarriage / repeat loss. I think this is a larger "secret" group than most realize -- no one talks about it. The "market" is geared toward "getting you pregnant", but not many options for those who have trouble carrying to term. What do you do when you get pregnant easily, but suffer the trauma of devastating loss after loss? IVF is invasive, costly, and does not guarantee a healthy baby in 9 months.
The natural, less-invasive methods appealed to me -- rather than bypassing your body's natural process and ignoring the underlying problem.
This is very exciting. I had to pay out of pocket to even get a consultation/testing with a RE -- who gave us no answers -- before I even knew NaPro existed. Get the word out!

Sarah Johnson said...

What about those of us who are perfectly healthy, but our husband's suffer from severe IF? According to more than one doctor this was just how my dh was born. Nothing could be done to fix it.

I did do IVF. And I gave every single embryo a chance. I too believe that life begins at conception. God still has the final say and blessed me with my 3 children.

And I know you didnt say it, TCIE, but please be a little considerate. I have a very strong faith in God. Saying "IVF and other soul destroying technology" is pretty harsh.

Sarah Johnson said...

Oh, and if I would have been the one diagnosed with IF, or ours was unexplained, I would have for sure been interested in NaPro. I would much rather try to fix the problem than just put a band aid over it. I think the overall health aspect is what would get me interested.

Anonymous said...

Tables showing the average out of pocket cost for IVF, IUI and Napro, with insurance that covers infertility, and that doesn't cover infertility. Up to date charts that compare success rates btwn napro and ART, for different conditions (endo, pcos, etc.) also compare average time that it takes to conceive a full term baby. How long for the next children, too. I personally know several people who rushed into IVF then got pregnant when their babies were 4 to 6 months old so not much was really wrong with them to begin with. If someone doesn't have patience, napro is really not for them. I think it's really only for religious, or crunchy types or people who are freaked out by creating embryos in a lab and letting some of them die. One can argue that they die anyway each month with napro. A table showing theaverage weeks gestation with napro vs ivf, risk of twins, triplets, babies that are born early, have to go stay at nicu, types of complications from premature births, etc.

I wouldn't specifically advertise napro as a form of BC for fertile non-catholics.

Stephanie Z said...

My cousin is not at all religious and did use IVF to conceive, but when she underwent it, she hadn't really been aware how low the success rates were, especially considering the cost. She specifically said that they might not have done IVF if they were fully aware of how low the success rates are. I think that emphasizing success rates for a given cause of IF and cost would help.

I think it is possible that there is some subpopulation of women who are very into "natural" and "organic" that would be interested in CrMS.